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Case study 2: North Sea Demersal Roundfish Fisheries

Introduction - Overview description of the case study

Description of the fishery, stocks and management system

The fishery

The total value of European landings from the North Sea was 941 million EURO in average during the period 2002-2004 (EIAA-Model, 2006; Anon. 2004) of which roundfish species (cod, haddock, whiting and saithe) account for approximately 20 % of this (EIAA Model, 2006).

The demersal fisheries in the North Sea and Skagerrak can be categorized as a) human consumption fisheries, and b) industrial fisheries which land the majority of their catch for reduction purposes. The main fisheries use towed gears, primarily trawls, although there is also some gillnetting for cod. Human consumption fisheries use otter trawls, pair trawls, Nephrops-trawls, seines, gill nets, or beam trawls, and the demersal part usually either target a mixture of roundfish species (cod, haddock, whiting), a mixture of flatfish species (plaice and sole) with a by-catch of roundfish, or Nephrops with a bycatch of roundfish and flatfish. There is a directed fishery for saithe along the northern margins of the North Sea (shelf edge), but saithe are also caught in mixed catches in other areas. The small meshed otter trawl fishery targeting industrial species, and here especially the Norway pout and Blue whiting fishery as well as the mixed clupeoid fishery, have bycatches of roundfish species.

The principle roundfish species in the North Sea are cod, haddock, whiting and saithe. The distributions of these four species overlap to a large extent, with the result that they are usually taken in mixed fisheries. The fisheries take place primarily in the Northern North Sea, although the distributions of whiting and cod also extend into the southern North Sea and the Eastern Channel.

There are strong technical interactions between the cod, haddock and whiting fisheries in the North Sea on the one hand, and between the sole and plaice fisheries on the other. The flatfish and roundfish landings are generally taken by different fleet segments, with the exception of gill-netters which may potentially target any of these groups of species. Links with Nephrops fisheries are less clear, but Nephrops and roundfish are caught in the same fisheries. Most of the human consumption demersal fleets are involved in mixed fisheries. Demersal trawlers are involved in fisheries for roundfish, flatfish, Pandalus, and Nephrops while the gill-netters and Danish seiners exploit flatfish and cod. The fisheries landing saithe have a relatively low impact on the others.

The stocks (fishery resources)

The stock of cod in the North Sea has decreased more or less continuously since the 1970s, whereas fishing mortality has steadily increased over the same period, with the result that the stock is now at a very low level, and is considered to be well outside of safe biological limits. The haddock stock has shown more fluctuation in response to occasional very strong year classes, which tend to not survive to have high influence on the stock size due to the high level of fishing mortality on the stock. However, in recent years strong year classes have strengthened stock size to above the precautionary level for this stock (e.g. fish spawned in 1999). Following a long decline, the spawning stock of whiting has recently shown a small increase. This is partly due to a reduction in fishing mortality, although the stock in recent years is still considered to be outside of safe biological limits. The saithe stock has increased from a low point in the late 1980s which, coupled with a decreasing trend in fishing mortality, means that the stock in recent time is considered to be inside of safe biological limits.

In the North Sea all stocks of roundfish and flatfish species have been exposed to high levels of fishing mortality for a long period. For most of these stocks their lowest observed spawning stock size has been seen in recent years. This may be an indication of excessive fishing effort, possibly combined with an effect of a climatic phase which is un-favourable to recruitment. Each of the roundfish stocks is assessed and advice produced on single stock basis. Biological interactions and fleet specific technical interactions are not directly incorporated in the assessments or the forecasts for the North Sea stocks. For a number of years, ICES has recommended significant and sustained reductions in fishing mortality on some of the stocks. In order to achieve this, significant reductions in fishing effort are required.

Overview description of current management system (management measures and advice)

The North Sea roundfish fisheries are primarily managed and regulated by annual, single species TACs. In addition, they are also subject to a range of other management measures, including minimum landing sizes, and mesh and by-catch regulations. In general, the human-consumption fisheries in the North Sea and Skagerrak have been subject to a number of restrictive management measures in recent years, in response to declining stock abundance. In addition, a series of decommissioning rounds have reduced fleet size in a number of countries over the years. These measures have all had an effect on reported effort, although it must be remembered that fleet efficiency is not constant and realized catch rates may not have declined commensurately with effort. In addition, in response to the recent very poor state of the cod stock, other measures have been introduced on an ad hoc basis including a cod spawning closure in 2001, and days at sea limitations from 2003/2004 and onwards as an effort regulation on top on the TAC regulation, as well as revised gear regulations and vessel decommissioning schemes.

Main advisory and management problems

The key management and advisory problems identified in relation to the North Sea roundfish fisheries can be summarized as follows:

• Single species TACs problematic in a mixed-species context

• No socio-economic considerations in management advice

• Ad hoc, emergency management measures difficult to evaluate (e.g. cod and haddock recovery plans)

• Fisheries strongly dependent on recruiting year-classes (and their growth) leading to problems and uncertainty in assessments and forecasts

Mixed fisheries, discard and mis-reporting in relation to management system: One consequence of the mixed nature of the roundfish fisheries is that nets which retain fish of the minimum landing size of the smallest species (whiting) will also retain relatively high numbers of undersized fish of the other species, and as a result the fisheries are characterized by this selectivity and extensive discarding, particularly of undersized haddock and whiting, although some whiting which are above the minimum landing size are also discarded. There are also discards of undersized cod, but this has been less well studied than discarding of haddock and whiting. The single species TACs used to manage the North Sea roundfish fisheries typically take no account of the differing stock status of the different species, and as a result boats which exhaust their quota for one species will often continue fishing to take their quota for the other species. As a result, their catches of the first species will either be discarded or landed illegally. These two aspects of the mixed-fishery problem in the North Sea lead to problems in the catch at age data that are the basis of the assessments used as the basis of scientific advice for these fisheries. As a result, it can be seen that the mixed-fishery aspects of the roundfish fisheries can be problematic for a single species TAC-based management system. World wide experiences indicate that (fleet based) effort regulation might to a higher degree reflect these aspects of mixed fisheries.

Cod recovery in the North Sea and effectiveness of management measures under existing management system: The recent depletion of the North Sea cod stock to a very low level has resulted in a series of short-term management measures which have been intended to provide some measure of protection to the cod stock. In addition to low TACs which have been intended to restrict fishing effort, a spawning closure was introduced in 2001. This involved closing a large area of the North Sea to roundfish vessels during the cod spawning season. More recently, following the recent ICES advice that all fisheries for North Sea cod and associated species should be closed (e.g. in 2003) in order to protect the cod stock, further management measures have been introduced including effort limitations and funding for decommissioning to enable some reduction of fleet capacity. These measures have all been introduced at short notice with little attempt or opportunity to evaluate the effect they will have. Nonetheless, evaluation of the effects of these measures is required for forecast and management purposes, even though the short-notice, ad hoc, nature of the management actions makes this a difficult task. The same is the case in relation to the evaluation of the North Sea haddock recovery plans. The more recent advice that all fisheries on North Sea cod and associated species should be closed highlighted a problem with the existing form of management advice. The advice for closure was widely criticized by the fishing industry, not least because it took no account of the severe socio-economic consequences of such a closure. This is a specific case of a more general criticism that the current form of advice is based only on biological criteria and does not account for economic considerations in any way. Also it highlights the problems associated with evaluating emergency management measures on a short time basis because the reference time series both before and after introduction of the measures are too short to identify the overall effects.

In general, evaluation of the effects of differnt measures undertaken for stock recovery is required for forecast and management purposes, even though the short-notice, ad hoc, nature of the management actions makes this a difficult task as stated above. This is also the case in relation to the North Sea haddock recovery plans.

Effects of variation in recruitment and growth in relation to biological advice and management for highly exploited stocks: The stocks of cod, haddock and whiting in the North Sea have been subject to high levels of fishing mortality for many years. As a result, these stocks all have truncated age-distributions, and the stocks and fisheries are highly dependent upon the strength of recruiting year classes. One consequence of this is that if a strong year class does recruit to the fishery, the fleet may adapt its fishing practices in order to target that year class. This can cause problems for the assumptions made in fitting the stock assessment model, and thus lead to uncertainty in and problems with the assessment. In addition, catch forecasts can be very sensitive to assumptions about growth, discarding and maturity of these exceptional year-classes, again leading to problems in assessment performance. Such problems have been observed in relation to the 1996 year-class of cod and the 1999 year-class of haddock in the North Sea.

Description of scenario evaluations under Case Study 2

The specific management issues addressed and reflected in the scenario evaluations under this case study (CS2) are the following:

1. Evaluate effects of using combined output and input management (TAC, TAE): Evaluation of effects of managing mixed fisheries under a quota system or an effort system. This is an example of a complex bio-economic scenario-evaluation-system which requires specification of alternative behavioral rules under alternative management scenarios. Evaluation in relation to this also addresses and discuss effects of certain management measures in relation to cod recovery plans under the different management systems. The evaluations include economic effects of the different scenarios evaluated giving possibility for socio-economic considerations in relation to the management advice.

2. Evaluate the biological effects of North Sea cod recovery plans addressing management issue one by evaluating effects of certain management measures in relation to cod recovery plans. The aim of the approaches has been evaluation of management plans for cod and haddock by development and applicaton of the evaluation framework implemented under FLR. For example has the FLR (FL-Core, FL-Fisboat and FL-Ogive) also been used to evaluate management plans under the umbrella of current ICES VIa cod recovery plans. Both the North Sea and VIa cod stocks are currently subject to a recovery plan utilising the same harvest control rules. Finally, the approach has evaluated North Sea haddock recovery plans as a cooperation between ICES WGNSSK and FRS Marine Laboratory using FLR. As such this approach addresses the problem that ad hoc, emergency management measures so far has been difficult to evaluate (e.g. cod and haddock recovery plans).

3. Evaluate effect on fisheries management in relation to discarding / misreporting: Evaluate scenarios with respect to discard evaluation using the R/FLR framework. The R/FLR OM developed under Approach 1 as well as under Case Study 4 are used to evaluate different discard scenarios in the mixed fisheries context in relation to application of different gear technological selectivity properties and regulations. The approach has incorporated results from a scientific study that utilises a gear selectivity formula, coupled with sorting ogive and length distribution at age data to generate discard numbers. This has been used in relation to conditioning (calibrating) the operating models, as well as to perform sensitivity analyses of the operating models, in relation to use of different selectivity properties. Consequently, this approach is an example of including or excluding information of discarding (and possibly misreporting) on the quality of the biological advice and on the TAC based fisheries management. Such work can include investigation of compliance with regulations and incentives for misreporting and discarding. This is an example of aspects of mixed fisheries with a focus on discard (and mis-reporting) where the discard scenarios using different gear technological solutions and management measures can be evaluated in this context.

Base case: Theres is no overall and common base case formulated for all of the approaches together addressing the case specific scenario evaluations. Base cases have been in context of the different approaches, however, in several approaches the same OM is used. For example the base case for Approach 1 is a bio-economic simulation framework consisting of a biological OM using single species ICES stock assessment data (ICES, 2007a,2008) for two species (cod, haddock), and an economical OM consisting of economical-technical fleet interaction models including 12 EU fleets (by gear and country) accounting for 80% of the landings plus one “other-fleet” resulting in several métiers (mesh size range) using STECF data (EC, 2001) and the EIAA data format (Hoff and Frost, 2006; Hoff and Frost, 2008).

Description of approaches for scenario evaluations under Case Study 2

Approach 1: Evaluation of effort regulation focusing on mixed fisheries aspects

Case Study 2, Approach 1, Evaluation of effort regulation focusing on mixed fisheries aspects

This approach aims to evaluate scenarios addressing the management issue one and two related to the mixed fisheries aspects of management system used as well as discarding using a bio-economic model. The approach has focussed on the fleet-based effects of stock-based management procedures in a mixed-fisheries context. As such the scenarios also considers the different effects of managing mixed fisheries under a qouta system compared to an effort system in relation to applying different fleet based effort levels. The evaluation have included (i) description of the international fleets and metiers, and their technical interactions, (ii), linkages with economic modelling of the dynamic of these fleets and (iii) implementation of the complex HCR which form the current and future basis of proposals for management plans in the European Commission. Additionally, there has been put emphasis on developing more realistic biological OM.

Approach 2: Evaluating North Sea cod (and haddock) recovery plans as well as ICES VIa recovery plans

Case Study 2, Approach 2, Evaluating North Sea cod and haddock recovery plans, as well as ICES VIa cod recovery plans

This approach has aimed to evaluate the biological effects of North Sea cod recovery plans addressing management issue one by evaluating effects of certain management measures in relation to cod recovery plans.

Another scientific work made under the FRS Marine Laboratory national work uses FLR (FL-Core, FL-Fisboat and FL-Ogive) to evaluate management plans under the umbrella of current cod recovery plans. Focus here was the development and application of an evaluation framework implemented under FLR. The stock considered was VIa cod rather than North Sea cod but both stocks are currently subject to a recovery plan utilising the same harvest control rules.

A third study under ICES WGNSSK and FRS Marine Laboratory used FLR to evaluate North Sea haddock recovery plans. Also this work has been put in context of the above approach. Focus is here also development and application of an evaluation framework implemented under FLR.

Approach 3: Evaluation of discard focusing on mixed fisheries aspects

Case Study 2, Approach 3, Evaluation of discard focusing on mixed fisheries aspects

This approach aims to evaluate scenarios addressing management issue two with respect to discard evaluation. The approach has used the OM developed under Approach 1 as well as the OM developed under Case Study 4 (in cooperation with CS4 and the EU FP6 Necessity Project) to evaluate different discard scenarios in the mixed fisheries context in relation to application of different gear technological selectivity properties and regulations.

Approach 4: Evaluation of effect of using different assessments in the biological advice

Several different stock assessment models have been thoroughly implemented in the R/FLR framework or in the process of being finally implemented (FLSURBA, FLICA besides the FLXSA). Furthermore, under CS4 evaluation of length based assessment methods using the R/FLR framework has been given. As all this are in full progress of being implemented under the ICES assessment working groups this will not be further addressed here.

Results (summary of scenario evaluations)

Approach 1, Evaluation of effort regulation focusing on mixed fisheries aspects:

Under Approach 1 an operating model has been developed in R/FLR that is multi-dimensional with respect to including several roundfish stocks, fleets and fisheries. The model is capable of evaluating different harvest control rules (MSE) and technical management measures in mixed fisheries. This includes evaluation of both TAC and effort regulation scenarios. The model has been successfully conditioned (calibrated) to recent historical ICES stock and catch (landings) estimates. Accordingly, there have been performed simulations with the biological (and fleet) based part of the operating model with success resulting in realistic model output. Also under Approach 1 the AHF economical model has been further developed and formulated into R/FLR, and is now a final economic fleet based model with focus on fleet capacity (exit / entry). This model has been successfully linked with (and imbedded into) the above biological operating model in order to develop a full scale bio-economic fisheries management evaluation model that operates on a fleet, fisheries and stock basis.

The approach has evaluated effects of using combined output and input management (TAC, TAE), i.e. evaluated effects of managing mixed fisheries under a quota system or an effort system. This is an example of implementation of a complex bio-economic scenario-evaluation-system which has required specification of alternative behavioral rules under alternative management scenarios. The evaluation has also addressed and discussed effects of certain management measures in relation to cod recovery plans under the different management systems. The evaluations include economic effects of the different scenarios evaluated giving possibility for socio-economic considerations in relation to the management advice. In conclusion bio-economic effects on stocks and fleets has been evaluated under different scenarios concerning catch and potential discard of roundfish and Nephrops.

The ICES SGMixMan was very positive about that work. The results were found to be very consistent with qualitative and quantitative observations. They could, thus, be interpreted in the light of current knowledge on the state of the stocks and the expected effects of main management measures. There has long been evidence and claims from the industry about the negative effects of restrictive cod TACs, and this could be reproduced quantitatively here with a fairly simple model.

The SG thus considered that such mixed-fisheries forecast were consistent and robust while not being too data-demanding, and thus could potentially be used in the future to deliver timely mixed-fisheries advice.

This work was then further presented to ICES AMAWGC in february 2008, which also came with positive feedbacks, and discussed the potential application and use of it in an advisory context.

Approach 2, Evaluating North Sea cod (and haddock) recovery plans as well as ICES VIa recovery plans:

Under Approach 2 the first approach was to apply another biological operating model, that is also fishery based, which was originally developed in B-Adapt (national initiative). This model is in relation to EFIMAS formulated into R/FLR. This approach has evaluated the biological effects of North Sea cod recovery plans addressing management issue one by evaluating effects of certain management measures in relation to cod recovery plans.

The second approach hereunder has included work made in cooperation with ICES WGNSSK and FRS Marine Laboratory national work. Results of using FLR to evaluate management plans under the umbrella of current North Sea cod recovery plans are presented in ICES WGNSSK (2006), section 16 and Working Document 18: ICES WGNSSK 2006, section 16 and Working Document 18. Focus here was the development and application of an evaluation framework implemented under FLR. This has also been the case in relation to an additional work hereunder evaluating recovery plans of ICES VIa cod rather than North Sea cod but both stocks are currently subject to a recovery plan utilising the same harvest control rules.

The third approach hereunder has been done as a cooperation with ICES and FRS as well. Results of the evaluation of North Sea haddock recovery and management plans in relation to various management measures using modelling in F/RLR is presented in ICES WGNSSK Report (2006), section 16: ICES WGNSSK 2006, section 16. Focus in this work has also been development and application of an evaluation framework implemented under FLR.

Approach 3 Evaluation of discard focusing on mixed fisheries aspects:

Under approach 3 biological effects on stocks and fleets has been evaluated under different scenarios concerning catch and potential discard of roundfish and Nephrops when applying different management options and measures as well as different selection parameters in the model obtained from the NECESSITY Project (Case Study 4). The results show examples of including or excluding information of discarding (and possibly misreporting) on the quality of the biological advice and on the TAC based fisheries management. This work has the potential of investigation of compliance with regulations and incentives for misreporting and discarding, that is aspects of mixed fisheries with a focus on discard (and mis-reporting) where the discard scenarios using different gear technological solutions and management measures can be evaluated.

Approach 3 (and Approach 4) have through the scientific research conducted in cooperation with ICES and national institutes partly provided selectivity parameters for the mixed roundfish and nephrops fisheries as well as implemented various assessment models in R/FLR. These parameters and output from different assessment runs have been obtained by developing and applying various descriptive analysis tools.

Dissemination

A report on the discard estimation methodology will form one part in a series of reports to be published by Fisheries Research Services (FRS), Scotland in relation to an internal research project investigating Harvest Control Rules (HCRs) and using R/FLR in a manner similar to this case study.

Anon, (2003). Appendix 5 of Report of Expert Meeting on Cod Assessment and Technical Measures. Brussels April/May 2003. DGFish, European Commission, Brussels.

CEFAS, 2006. Results of the evaluation of the biological effects of North Sea cod recovery plans in relation to various management measures using the modelling in B-Adapt is so far given in a national report produced by CEFAS (UK). The B-Adapt Model is in the process of being formulated into R/FLR. CEFAS Report, CEFAS, UK. 2006.

ECONOWS (2008). ECONOWS: Report from the Economic Workshops of EFIMAS.

Hamon, K., Ulrich, C., Hoff, A. and Kell, L. 2007. Evaluation of management strategies for the mixed North Sea roundfish fisheries with the FLR framework Presentation to MODSIM07 Conference, 10-13 december 2007, Christchurch, New Zealand with Hamon et al. peer-review publication in conference proceedings.

Hoff, A., and Frost, H. 2006. Economic response to harvest and effort control in fishery. Report no. 185. Institute of Food and Ressource Economics. Copenhagen.

Hoff, A., Frost, H. (2008). Modelling economic response to harvest and effort control in the North Sea cod fishery. Aquat. Living Resour., 21 (forthcoming).

ICES, 2007(a). Results of the evaluation of the biological effects of North Sea cod recovery plans in relation to various management measures using the modelling FLR to evaluate management plans under the umbrella of current North Sea cod recovery plans are presented in ICES WGNSSK (2006), section 16 and Working Document 18: ICES WGNSSK 2006, section 16 and Working Document 18.

ICES, 2007(b). Results of the evaluation of North Sea haddock management plan in relation to various management measures using modelling in F/RLR is presented in ICES WGNSSK Report (2006), section 16: ICES WGNSSK 2006, section 16 and Working Document 18. ICES C.M. 2007/ACFM:35

ICES SGMixMan 2006, 2007, 2008

Needle, C. L. (2006a). Evaluating harvest control rules for North Sea haddock using FLR. Working Paper for the ICES Working Group on Methods of Stock Assessment, Galway, Ireland, 21-26 June 2006.

Needle, C. L. (2006b). Further evaluations of hervest control rules for North Sea haddock using FLR. Discussion document for FRS and SEERAD.

Needle, C. L. (2006c). Revised FLR-based evaluation of candidate harvest control rules for North Sea haddock. Working paper for the ICES Advisory Committee for Fisheries Management, Copenhagen, October 2006.

Needle, C. L., Marshall, C. T., Hoff, A. G. and Clarke, E. D. (2006). Using parametric length frequency distributions to characterise key dimensions of fish growth: A progress report. Working paper to the annual EFIMAS network meeting, Nantes, 4-7 April 2006.

Presentation to MODSIM07 Conference, 10-13 december 2007, Christchurch, New Zealand
with Hamon et al. peer-review publication in conference proceedings

Additionally:

Agnarsson, S., Arnason, R., Johannsdottir, K., Ravn-Jonsen, L., Sandal, L.K., Steinshamn, S.I., and Vestergaard, N. 2007. Comparative Evaluation of the Fisheries Policies in Denmark, Iceland and Norway: Multispecies and Stochastic issues. Report SNF, Norway: 102 pp.

Comparative Evaluation of the Fisheries Policies in Denmark, Iceland and Norway: Multispecies and Stochastic issues

MSE :
Presentation to AFH (French Association of Fisheries Science) Conference, 19-21 June 2007, La Rochelle, France
Presentation to MODSIM07 Conference, 10-13 december 2007, Christchurch, New Zealand
with Hamon et al. peer-review publication in conference proceedings

Presentation to ICES SGMixMan, January 2008
Presentation in relation to ICES SGMixMan, Jan 2008

Presentation to EFIMAS Conference, March 2008
Mixed Fisheries MSE in ICES WGMIXMAN, EFIMAS Conf., Bruxelles March 2008

Presentation to EU PROFET Conference, Copenhagen, June 2008\\EU FP6 PROFET Conference, Cph. June 2008

Fcube :

Presentation to ICES SFMS, ICES Symposium on Fisheries Management Strategies, 27-30 June 2006, Galway, Ireland.

Reeves and Ulrich, 2007 paper presented to ICES ASC, 17-21 September 2007, Helsinki, Finland.

Presentation to ICES AMAWGC, February 2008

Links to Other Work

This works links up to the work in EFIMAS Case Study 4. Also, the work uses data provided from ICES (WGNSSK, WGMIXMAN) and EU STECF. Also the project uses results from the EU FP6 NECESSITY Project in relation to discard and selectivity parameters. EFIMAS deliver on the other hand needed simulations to the results of the NECESSITY Project. Furthermore, the work is conducted in cooperation with the ICES WGNSSK and WGMIXMAN Working Groups.

References

Anonymous, 2002. Annual Economic Report 2002. Economic performance of selected European fishing fleets. Report EU Commission, Bruxelles. 2002

Anonymous, 2003. Appendix 5 of Report of Expert Meeting on Cod Assessment and Technical Measures. Brussels April/May 2003. DGFish, European Commission, Brussels.

Anonymous, 2004. Annual Economic Report 2004. Economic performance of selected European fishing fleets. Report EU Commission, Bruxelles. 2004.

Casey, J. 1996. Estimating discards using selectivity data: the effects of including discard data in assessments of the demersal fisheries in the Irish Sea. J. Northw. Atl. Fish Sci., 19, 91-102.

Council Reg. (EC) No 51/2006 of 22 December 2005 fixing for 2006 the fishing opportunities and associated conditions for certain fish stocks and groups of fish stocks, applicable in Community waters and, for Community vessels, in waters where catch limitations are required, 183 pp.

EC (2001). COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 1639/2001 of 25 July 2001 establishing the minimum and extended Community programmes for the collection of data in the fisheries sector and laying down detailed rules for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 1543/2000. No. 1639/2001.

ECONOWS (2008). ECONOWS: Report from the Economic Workshops of EFIMAS.

EFIMAS Addendum to ContractEFIMAS_502516_Addendum to Contract_24May2006

Hoff, A., and Frost, H. 2006. Economic response to harvest and effort control in fishery. Report no. 185. Institute of Food and Ressource Economics. Copenhagen.

Hoff, A., Frost, H. (2008). Modelling economic response to harvest and effort control in the North Sea cod fishery. Aquat. Living Resour., 21 (forthcoming).

ICES SGMixMan 2006, 2007, 2008

ICES 2007. Report on the Assessment of Demersal Stocks in the North Sea and Skagerrak. Copenhagen, Denmark, 5-14 September, 2006. ICES CM 2007/ACFM:35

Acknowledgements

EFIMAS Contribution to the work

The main work has been conducted under EFIMAS, among other this work under Case Study 2 links up to the work in EFIMAS Case Study 4 as described above. The work uses data provided from ICES (WGNSSK, WGMIXMAN) and EU STECF. Also the project uses results from the EU FP6 NECESSITY Project in relation to discard and selectivity parameters. EFIMAS deliver on the other hand needed simulations to the results of the NECESSITY Project. Furthermore, the work is conducted in cooperation with the ICES WGNSSK and WGMIXMAN Working Groups. Furthermore, some work in relation to this links up to work performed by the National Research Institutes participating in WP4, CS2, especially in relation to Approach 2, Approach 3, and Approach 4.

Participants

Coordinator: J. Rasmus Nielsen

Participants: Clara Ulrich, Katell Hamon, Per J. Sparre, Ayoe Hoff, Hans Frost, Laurence Kell, Trevor Hutton, Alyson Little, Stuart Reeves, Coby Needle, Steven Holmes, Liz Clarke, Martin Pastoors, Jan Jaap-Poos, Sarah Kraak, Jos Smit, Hans van Oostenbrugge, Doug Wilson, Stein Steinshamn, Wim Demaré, Odd Smedstad, Bjarte Bogstad, Trond Bjorndal.

Meeting Documents and Other Case Specific Work - working documents, models, analyses etc.

Delivery Matrix by April 2006 (Note: See text from Meeting Minutes WP4 from EFIMAS Maastricht Meetings, September 2006). Case Study 2 Delivery Matrix

J. Rasmus Nielsen 2007/01/31 08:17

 
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